Review of Jazz Lines...free verse in the key of jazz  

by Debbie Burke

Author of Icarus Flies Home 

Sing a song of jazz titles
From musicians near and far
Big band, bebop, traditional
Bring lyrics to where you are

Ed Berger’s photos lovingly placed
In luminous black & white
Accompanied by free verse from
Gloria Krolak from NPR, that’s aight

In her book from 2018, NPR host and author Gloria Krolak uses the photos of Ed Berger and poetry to tell a story of the jazz life. The images are lush and convey the right mood: Lee Konitz, Christian McBride, Carol Fredette, Kurt Elling. Krolak’s free verse explores categories that song titles suggest: the passage of time through the days of the week; an address book with women’s names (“Georgia on My Mind,” “Nancy with the Laughing Face”) and anatomy (“Body and Soul,” “Sugar Hips”). Krolak is the host of “Good Vibes” and is a jazz columnist.

Photographer Ed Berger (1949-2017), who at 16 took his first jazz photo at a Louis Armstrong concert, was an author, radio host and record producer.

“Jazz Lines” is inventive, satisfying, and beautifully produced.

 Also visit 

https://www.amazon.com/Free-Verse-Photos-Key-Jazz/dp/1364810085.

(c) 2021 Debbie Burke

Food For Thought
  • Gloria Krolak

Updated: Sep 25, 2020

I am only one. But still I am one.

I cannot do everything. But still I can do something.

And because I cannot do everything I will not refuse

to do the something I can do.

(Edward Everett Hale)



  • Gloria Krolak

Updated: Sep 25, 2020

It was a great day meeting new people and selling books with author Shannon Kaprive (Something So Real), publisher Lydia Inglett and her trusty assistant Alex. Although it was hot,we were under a tent and Jolyon (Lydia's husband), our hero, kept us hydrated with fresh lemonade.

Updated: Sep 25, 2020

April is Jazz Appreciation Month (with the ever-so-appropriate nickname, JAM) and there are so many ways to celebrate.

Here’s just a few: Read a jazz biography or history. Rent a movie about jazz – there are some good ones that come very close to reality and there are some indy documentaries that are totally worthwhile. Subscribe to a jazz magazine. Join your local jazz society. Attend a live performance, one at a time or a jazz festival, make it a family vacation. Follow your favorite musicians on social media. Make a donation to your favorite jazz radio station (that’s JazzOn2, right?).

A little history of JAM. It began in 2001 at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History by the museum’s curator, John Edward Hasse. The U.S. Congress passed the legislation and it was signed by President George W Bush in 2003. It was originally funded by the Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation. As the program grew, so did the list of public and private institutions helping JAM achieve its vision of advancing and promoting jazz as our cultural treasure, born in America and celebrated worldwide.

©2018 by Gloria Krolak. Site by Lydia Inglett Publishing

©Ed Berger Photography